BACKGROUND ON THE GOALS

The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) were born at the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in Rio de Janeiro in 2012. The objective was to produce a set of universal goals that meet the urgent environmental, political and economic challenges facing our world.

The SDGs replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which started a global effort in 2000 to tackle the indignity of poverty. The MDGs established measurable, universally-agreed objectives for tackling extreme poverty and hunger, preventing deadly diseases, and expanding primary education to all children, among other development priorities.

For 15 years, the MDGs drove progress in several important areas: reducing income poverty, providing much needed access to water and sanitation, driving down child mortality and drastically improving maternal health. They also kick-started a global movement for free primary education, inspiring countries to invest in their future generations. Most significantly, the MDGs made huge strides in combatting HIV/AIDS and other treatable diseases such as malaria and tuberculosis.

GOAL 1: NO POVERTY

GOAL 1: NO POVERTY

The SDGs are a bold commitment to finish what we started, and end poverty in all forms and dimensions by 2030. This involves targeting the most vulnerable, increasing access to basic resources and services, and supporting communities affected by conflict and climate-related disasters.

 

 

GOAL 2: ZERO HUNGER

GOAL 2: ZERO HUNGER

The SDGs aims to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030, making sure all people – especially children – have access to sufficient and nutritious food all year round. This involves promoting sustainable agricultural practices..

More

 

 

GOAL 3: GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

GOAL 3: GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING

The aim is to achieve universal health coverage and provide access to safe and affordable medicines and vaccines for all. Supporting research and development for vaccines is an essential part of this process as well.

More

 

 

GOAL 4: QUALITY EDUCATION

GOAL 4: QUALITY EDUCATION

Since 2000, there has been enormous progress in achieving the target of universal primary education. The total enrolment rate in developing regions reached 91 percent in 2015, and the worldwide number of children out of school has dropped by almost half. There has also been a dramatic increase in literacy rates, More..

 

 

GOAL 5: GENDER EQUALITY

GOAL 5: GENDER EQUALITY

The SDGs aim to build on these achievements to ensure that there is an end to discrimination against women and girls everywhere. There are still huge inequalities in the labor market in some regions, with women systematically denied equal access to jobs.  More…

 

 

 

GOAL 6: CLEAN WATER AND SANITATION

GOAL 6: CLEAN WATER AND SANITATION

Ensuring universal access to safe and affordable drinking water for all by 2030 requires we invest in adequate infrastructure, provide sanitation facilities, and encourage hygiene at every level. Protecting and restoring water-related ecosystems such as forests, mountains. More

 

 

GOAL 7: AFFORDABLE AND CLEAN ENERGY

GOAL 7: AFFORDABLE AND CLEAN ENERGY

Ensuring universal access to affordable electricity by 2030 means investing in clean energy sources such as solar, wind and thermal. Adopting cost-effective standards for a wider range of technologies could also reduce the global electricity consumption by buildings and industry by 14 percent. More..

 

 

GOAL 8: DECENT WORK AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

GOAL 8: DECENT WORK AND ECONOMIC GROWTH

The SDGs promote sustained economic growth, higher levels of productivity and technological innovation. Encouraging entrepreneurship and job creation are key to this, as are effective measures to eradicate forced labor, slavery and human trafficking.  More…

 

 

 

GOAL 9: INDUSTRY, INNOVATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE

GOAL 9: INDUSTRY, INNOVATION AND INFRASTRUCTURE

Technological progress is also key to finding lasting solutions to both economic and environmental challenges, such as providing new jobs and promoting energy efficiency. Promoting sustainable industries, and investing in scientific research and innovation,  More

 

 

 

GOAL 10: REDUCED INEQUALITIES

GOAL 10: REDUCED INEQUALITIES

Income inequality is a global problem that requires global solutions. This involves improving the regulation and monitoring of financial markets and institutions, encouraging development assistance and foreign direct investment to regions where the need is greatest. Facilitating the safe migration and mobility of people is also key to bridging the widening divide. More..

 

 

 

GOAL 11: SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES

GOAL 11: SUSTAINABLE CITIES AND COMMUNITIES

Making cities safe and sustainable means ensuring access to safe and affordable housing, and upgrading slum settlements. It also involves investment in public transport, creating green public spaces, and improving urban planning and management in a way that is both participatory and inclusive.   More…

 

 

 

GOAL 12: RESPONSIBLE CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION

GOAL 12: RESPONSIBLE CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION

The efficient management of our shared natural resources, and the way we dispose of toxic waste and pollutants, are important targets to achieve this goal. Encouraging industries, businesses and consumers to recycle and reduce waste is equally important, as is supporting developing countries to move towards more sustainable patterns of consumption by 2030.  More

 

 

GOAL 13: CLIMATE ACTION

GOAL 13: CLIMATE ACTION

The annual average losses from earthquakes, tsunamis, tropical cyclones and flooding amount to hundreds of billions of dollars, requiring an investment of US$6 billion annually in disaster risk management alone. The goal aims to mobilize $100 billion annually by 2020 to address the needs of developing countries and help mitigate climate-related disasters. More..

 

 

GOAL 14: LIFE BELOW WATER

GOAL 14: LIFE BELOW WATER

The SDGs aim to sustainably manage and protect marine and coastal ecosystems from pollution, as well as address the impacts of ocean acidification. Enhancing conservation and the sustainable use of ocean-based resources through international law will also help mitigate some of the challenges facing our oceans.  More…

 

 

GOAL 15: LIFE ON LAND

GOAL 15: LIFE ON LAND

The SDGs aim to conserve and restore the use of terrestrial ecosystems such as forests, wetlands, drylands and mountains by 2020. Halting deforestation is also vital to mitigating the impact of climate change. Urgent action must be taken to reduce the loss of natural habitats and biodiversity which are part of our common heritage. More

 

 

GOAL 16: PEACE, JUSTICE AND STRONG INSTITUTIONS

GOAL 16: PEACE, JUSTICE AND STRONG INSTITUTIONS

The SDGs aim to significantly reduce all forms of violence, and work with governments and communities to find lasting solutions to conflict and insecurity. Strengthening the rule of law and promoting human rights is key to this process, as is reducing the flow of illicit arms and strengthening the participation of developing countries in the institutions of global governance.  More..

 

 

GOAL 17: PARTNERSHIPS FOR THE GOALS

GOAL 17: PARTNERSHIPS FOR THE GOALS

The goals aim to enhance North-South and South-South cooperation by supporting national plans to achieve all the targets. Promoting international trade, and helping developing countries increase their exports, is all part of achieving a universal rules-based and equitable trading system that is fair and open, and benefits all. More…

 

 

THE 2030 SD AGENDA

THE 2030 SD AGENDA

This Agenda is a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity. It also seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom. We recognise that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development.

 

 

 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

Greater sustainability can help businesses overcome global burdens to growth and deliver trillions in new market value.